In One Eye

Thursday, April 14, 2005
 
The pissing match over NCLB between Connecticut and the feds continues.
Attorney General Richard Blumenthal says he's not taking a meeting planned for next week as a sign the federal government will compromise on No Child Left Behind.

Blumenthal says a threatened state lawsuit may be why U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings decided to meet [Monday] with Connecticut Commissioner Betty Sternberg ...

Blumenthal says announcing plans to file the lawsuit got the attention of federal officials.
Golly. You think so? I've said it before: This is typical of the bullying Bushies to get conciliatory to a fault when they're challenged.
School superintendents and union leaders gathered at the Capitol to support Blumenthal's plans to challenge the law as an unfunded mandate.

The state believes No Child Left Behind requires too much standardized testing and unfairly tests children who don't speak English well or have disabilities.

If the federal government offers a waiver on some testing requirements, Blumenthal says the lawsuit will be unnecessary. But for now, he says, the state is on a course to court.
And I think it's a case the state should win—given the basis of the lawsuit.

The penny-pinching federal Republican legislative majority passed a law in the 90s making it illegal for the feds to institute unfunded mandates. The odious NCLB act is just such an edict.

It's hard to argue against the fact that Connecticut will have to expend $41 million of its own money in order to expedite the testing that the act mandates.

Since the feds are demanding that such testing occur, and proffering no money to pay for the testing, it's clear that the feds are in violation of the 90s statute.

No amount of talk between Betty Sternberg and Margaret Spellings will alter that fact.